Slowly and Steadily Changing Mindsets on Menstrual Isolation in Nepal

(Last Updated On: February 16, 2022)

Community leaders use their influence to talk about menstrual practices and makes lives better for women and girls

In Nepali communities, especially in remote villages, religious leaders and faith healers have a great deal of influence. That is why one of our priorities has been to address issues by changing the mindsets of these leaders in the community. The leaders are role models, are well-respected and have the power to influence people.

Discussion with group of women on chhaupadi practices at Gamaudi Dailekh e1644992429418

We mobilised a number of religious leaders to create awareness and sensitise the communities in a few districts on some important practices. They went house to house to discuss menstrual hygiene and the evils of menstrual isolation (chhaupadi). Religious leaders also shared their experiences and told families that god never said to restrict women and girls during menstruation period. He also added that it is a natural process of human creation, and emphasised the importance of nutritious food and love and care needed during this period. The team also shared added the the legal provisions and punishments if women and girls are compelled to stay in chhaupadi huts during menstruation.

Discussion with women in the community about menstrual hygiene and chhaupadi practices

“We spoke to families amd explained that menstruation is a natural process and that it is good for women and girls to follow hygiene, nutrition and necessary safety practices issues during menstruation,” said one of our Partner Field Staff.

It is a long road ahead to change, but we take it one step at a time. If you want to support more women and girls to escape menstrual isolation and lead a safe and healthy life, please support our Women’s Health Project.

CAED School June2017 60

Author: Pudens Isabel

One part writer, one part photographer & two parts traveller… Three years ago I decided something needed to change, so I quit my corporate job and started working for Asian Aid from my home in India. I travel to projects and schools we support in India and Nepal, bringing you their stories through words, photos and video. Since then I have been visiting Asian Aid projects with my camera and notebook in tow, to bring pictures and stories from the field to you.